Unpacking the Workbox

Dear Friends, it has been a long time between posts. My apologies. I still adore this project and it is now back on the front burner.

I started this project in 2004 and the research stage was a joy. I am assembling a key reference group for the project and will keep you informed as we go. But first I would like to share some photographs of a precious item. The Workbox of Georgian Molloy. So let’s start unpacking it!

The photographs were taken with permission of the National Trust.

Under the first layer which is a collection of sewing and craft bits and bobs, is the deeper compartment.

This holds special items and memorabilia collected by Georgiana.

This little brown carved nut was found wrapped in a few layers of paper.

When unscrunched the paper reads  “Bullet which wounded Cptn Molloy at Waterloo.”

Opening the nut revealed a white heavy (lead) ball. There was also a separate and newer note added by a decedent.

E. D D C

i.e. Mary Dorothea Du Cane (nee Molloy)

Mum’s                               ^                                                          Workbox

with Hubert’s bullet found in

Grandpapa Molloy after Waterloo

This is an astonishing item and not surprising that it was kept in the special and precious collection. It is well known that John Molloy fought at Waterloo under Wellington in the prestigious unit of the 95th Rifle Brigade. His grandchildren were aware of the stories about his military history as they quoted Hubert (surely a French name) as the source of the bullet.

 

 

 

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5 Responses to Unpacking the Workbox

  1. Holly Story says:

    So excited to hear of Georgiana again, I probably have to re subscribe, its been a while. I saw the workbox at Wannerup a long time ago but of course I wasn’t allowed to open it. I have been a long time fan of G , my husband’s family are remotely connected to the rev Story at Rosneath . I went to Carlisle and read some letters of hers too once. But what drew me to her was her evocative writing about coming to feel at home in the SW, her initial loneliness, strangeness in that place and her eventual joy in the natural beauty there combined with her fiercely inquisitive and intelligent pursuit of botanical research. I went through the same stages of alienation and then connection through the natural world, also in the sw, settling on a shared property in the 70’s shortly after arriving from the UK.I have made works around the theme of belonging for many years. hollystory.com if you want to see…
    I love what you are doing, thank you for your gentle appreciation of Gergiana
    Holly

    • admin says:

      Dear Holly, it is lovely to hear from you. Your name is linked with Georgiana in WA through your fine art. The next stage of the project will be quite expansive and there will be an “open” way in which people can contribute. As we revamp the this website we would be happy to link to your lovely website. I will follow up to make sure you get onto the mailing list.

      The Dunlop family, who lived at Kepoch House, Scotland, have been written about very admirably in a number of books. The Reverend Story was a fine man and married Helen Dunlop and they were the dear friends Georgiana talked about in her final hours.

  2. Elizabeth Kirby says:

    Hubert is a Germanic name actually. Unlikely that John Molloy’s grandson would have been given a French name, don’t you think? Love this research, keep it up.

    • admin says:

      Dear Elizabeth, I think it might mean that Hubert (a person, place, battalion?) was the identity, who shot John Molloy. I have not delved into enough military history to guess very well. PS.Did you get an email of this blog or come across it? I am trying to fathom if the subscribe/send email of the blog is working.

      • Elizabeth Kirby says:

        I like your joke about Hubert being the man who shot John Molloy! Poor Hubert, maligning him like that, he would be rather upset I think.
        I came across your newly-activated blog by accident; just idly interested in Georgiana – a great lady.
        Keep up the good work.

Your comments are very welcome!